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Anthony Bourdain: Parental Advisory. This Program is for Mature Adults. NOT for kiddies! →

anthonybourdain:

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I love Tokyo. If I had to eat only in one city for the rest of my life, Tokyo would be it. Most chefs I know would agree with me.
For those with restless, curious minds, fascinated by layer upon layer of things, flavors, tastes and customs, which we will never fully be able to understand,…

featuringod:

"Even with the brain dead, the heart still goes on beating, sort of like a Kardashian."

Bless Anthony Bourdain.

bluedogeyes:

Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown S02E04 - Copenhagen

"Between me and nature, there’s not so much love. Nature is where bugs live. But I’m learning reluctantly, over time, how much I’ve been missing"

- Anthony Bourdain

The Bourdain Bump? Interest in Sicily Spikes After Latest 'Parts Unknown' →

Pretty cool find —> “In the 48 hours after Parts Unknown‘s Sicily episode aired on Sunday, October 13, U.S. search activity for the three airports in Sicily soared 88.8 percent over the previous week.” 

and this ridiculous shiso sorbet to cap off an amazing meal thanks to chef sono & @cbcebulski (at Kyo Ya)

and this ridiculous shiso sorbet to cap off an amazing meal thanks to chef sono & @cbcebulski (at Kyo Ya)

sashimi platter: fresh octopus, madai snapper, blue fin, kanpachi yellow tail. (at Kyo Ya)

sashimi platter: fresh octopus, madai snapper, blue fin, kanpachi yellow tail. (at Kyo Ya)

Yuba And Uni Yoshino Style 😱 (at Kyo Ya)

Yuba And Uni Yoshino Style 😱 (at Kyo Ya)

Anthony Bourdain: FAILURE →

anthonybourdain:

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Failure has a smell. Of burnt synapses, of dick jokes and wet ashes.

Why, why, why can’t I get Sicily right?

I love Sicily. It’s beautiful. It’s old, it’s Italy but its not. I like the people—proudly mixed up, preyed upon by generations of invaders and a nearly ubiquitous fraternal…

big fan of kyleplatts, check out more of his work here and here. 

big fan of kyleplatts, check out more of his work here and here

el malecón, a staple of nyc #food (at El Malecon)

el malecón, a staple of nyc #food (at El Malecon)

Behind the Scenes: Parts Unknown - Copenhagen

Behind the Scenes: Parts Unknown Copenhagen 

the 10 commandments of The Law of Jante, as mentioned by Rene Redzepi in the Copenhagen episode. 

the 10 commandments of The Law of Jante, as mentioned by Rene Redzepi in the Copenhagen episode. 

luckypeach:

Last week we told you what happened to the figs from the ladies’ cover photo shoot. But I know what you were thinking: what end did that manly butternut squash meet?
The popsicles and pickles and sausages were easy enough to scarf, but you don’t just jam a huge butternut squash in your pie hole now, do you? No. You cook it the way Yotam Ottolenghi tells you to, because his is the only cookbook anyone uses anymore. Seriously, the internet is currently 45% people posting pictures of dishes from Jerusalem. We are no different: there’s a lot of good stuff in there. Like this: 
Roasted Butternut Squash and Red Onion with Tahini and Za’atar
INGREDIENTS
1 large butternut squash (2 1/4 lb. in total), cut into 3/4 by 2 1/2-inch wedges2 red onions, cut into 1 1/4-inch wedges3 1/2 Tbsp. olive oil3 1/2 Tbsp. light tahini paste1 1/2 Tbsp. lemon juice2 Tbsp. water1 small clove garlic, crushed3 1/2 Tbsp. pine nuts 1 Tbsp. za’atar1 Tbsp. coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsleyMaldon sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
PREPARATIONPreheat the oven to 475 degrees F.
Put the squash and onion in a large mixing bowl, add 3 tablespoons of the oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and some black pepper and toss well. Spread on a baking sheet with the skin facing down and roast in the oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until the vegetables have taken on some color and are cooked through. Keep an eye on the onions as they might cook faster than the squash and need to be removed earlier. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.To make the sauce, place the tahini in a small bowl along with the lemon juice, water, garlic, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Whisk until the sauce is the consistency of honey, adding more water or tahini if necessary.
Pour the remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons oil into a small frying pan and place over medium-low heat. Add the pine nuts along with 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook for 2 minutes, stirring often, until the nuts are golden brown. Remove from the heat and transfer the nuts and oil to a small bowl to stop the cooking.
To serve, spread the vegetables out on a large serving platter and drizzle over the tahini. Sprinkle the pine nuts and their oil on top, followed by the za’atar and parsley.
Propriety requires me to tell you: this was reprinted with generous permission from Jerusalem: A Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi, © 2012. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.

luckypeach:

Last week we told you what happened to the figs from the ladies’ cover photo shoot. But I know what you were thinking: what end did that manly butternut squash meet?

The popsicles and pickles and sausages were easy enough to scarf, but you don’t just jam a huge butternut squash in your pie hole now, do you? No. You cook it the way Yotam Ottolenghi tells you to, because his is the only cookbook anyone uses anymore. Seriously, the internet is currently 45% people posting pictures of dishes from Jerusalem. We are no different: there’s a lot of good stuff in there. Like this: 

Roasted Butternut Squash and Red Onion with Tahini and Za’atar

INGREDIENTS

1 large butternut squash (2 1/4 lb. in total), cut into 3/4 by 2 1/2-inch wedges
2 red onions, cut into 1 1/4-inch wedges
3 1/2 Tbsp. olive oil
3 1/2 Tbsp. light tahini paste
1 1/2 Tbsp. lemon juice
2 Tbsp. water
1 small clove garlic, crushed
3 1/2 Tbsp. pine nuts
1 Tbsp. za’atar
1 Tbsp. coarsely chopped flat-leaf parsley
Maldon sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

PREPARATION
Preheat the oven to 475 degrees F.

Put the squash and onion in a large mixing bowl, add 3 tablespoons of the oil, 1 teaspoon salt, and some black pepper and toss well. Spread on a baking sheet with the skin facing down and roast in the oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until the vegetables have taken on some color and are cooked through. Keep an eye on the onions as they might cook faster than the squash and need to be removed earlier. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.To make the sauce, place the tahini in a small bowl along with the lemon juice, water, garlic, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Whisk until the sauce is the consistency of honey, adding more water or tahini if necessary.

Pour the remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons oil into a small frying pan and place over medium-low heat. Add the pine nuts along with 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook for 2 minutes, stirring often, until the nuts are golden brown. Remove from the heat and transfer the nuts and oil to a small bowl to stop the cooking.

To serve, spread the vegetables out on a large serving platter and drizzle over the tahini. Sprinkle the pine nuts and their oil on top, followed by the za’atar and parsley.

Propriety requires me to tell you: this was reprinted with generous permission from Jerusalem: A Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi, © 2012. Published by Ten Speed Press, a division of Random House, Inc.